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'''Әһл әл-Байт''' ({{lang-ar|أهل البيت}}) Араб сөз тіркесі сөзбе-сөз ''Үй адамдары'' деген мағынаны білдіреді. The phrase "ahl al-bayt" was used in [[Arabian Peninsula|Arabia]] before the advent of [[Islam]] to refer to one's clan, and would be adopted by the ruling family of a [[Tribes of Arabia|tribe]]. Within the Islamic tradition, the term refers to the family of the [[Prophets of Islam|Islamic prophet]] [[Muhammad]].<ref name="AB-EOI">Ahl al-Bayt, ''Encyclopedia of Islam''</ref> The Ahl al-Bayt are particularly important to Shia Muslims because Shias generally derive their hadiths from the Ahl-al-Bayt and their close associates.
 
<!--The phrase "ahl al-bayt" was used in [[Arabian Peninsula|Arabia]] before the advent of [[Islam]] to refer to one's clan, and would be adopted by the ruling family of a [[Tribes of Arabia|tribe]]. Within the Islamic tradition, the term refers to the family of the [[Prophets of Islam|Islamic prophet]] [[Muhammad]].<ref name="AB-EOI">Ahl al-Bayt, ''Encyclopedia of Islam''</ref> The Ahl al-Bayt are particularly important to Shia Muslims because Shias generally derive their hadiths from the Ahl-al-Bayt and their close associates.
 
In [[Shia Islam]], the Ahl al-Bayt are central to Islam and interpreters of the Quran and sunnah. Shias believe they are [[Succession to Muhammad|successors of Muhammad]] and consist of Muhammad, [[Fatimah]], [[Ali]], [[Hasan ibn Ali|Hasan]] and [[Husayn ibn Ali|Husayn]] (known collectively as the ''[[Ahl al-Kisa]]'', "people of the mantle") and the [[imam]]s. There are differing opinions on the scope and importance of Ahl al-Bayt.
 
In [[Sunni Islam]], Muhammad's household includes [[Muhammad's wives|his wives]], his daughter, [[Fatimah]], his cousin and son-in-law, [[Ali]] and their two children, [[Hasan ibn Ali]] and [[Husayn ibn Ali]]. Other Sunni include all Muhammad's descendants and sometimes the descendants of his paternal uncle, [[‘Abbas ibn ‘Abd al-Muttalib]], the founders of the [[Abbasid Caliphate]].<ref name="who">[http://www.al-islam.org/encyclopedia/ Who are Ahlul-Bayt?]</ref> In Sunni and Shia thought, every Muslim has the obligation to love the Ahl al-Bayt.
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==Әһл әл-Байт==
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The term "Ahl" signifies the members of a household of a man, including his fellow tribesmen, kin, relatives, wife (or wives), children, and all those who share a family background, religion, housing, city, and country with him.{{Citation needed|date=May 2010}}
 
#Ahl Bayt al-Nabi (s) = Family of the House of the Prophet
#`Itrat al-Nabi = [People of the] Mantle of the Prophet
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==Interpretation==
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There has been much debate concerning who ''Ahl al- Bayt'' consists of. Although there have been many disagreements there is a consensus amongst Sunni and Shi'a Muslims, that the "Ahl al Kisa" hadith refers specifically to Ali, Fatimah, Hasan and Husayn. Mention of the ''Ahl al-Bayt'', Muhammad's household, is present in a verse of the Qur'an as follows:
 
 
Most, but not all Shi'a believe that these ''[[Imamah (Shi'a doctrine)|A'immah]]'' to be the divinely chosen [[Caliph|leaders]] of the [[Ummah|Muslim community]].<ref name="AB-EOI" /><ref>Madelung, 1997, pp. 13-17</ref> This is based on the hadith, "People of the Cloak", where the Prophet referred to only Fatimah, Ali, Hasan, Hussain and Himself (stating that wives were not part of the Ahl al Bayt because they could be divorced and were no longer part of the household when their husband died), a hadith which many Sunni Muslims believe in. Collectively Muhammad, Fatimah and the Twelve Imams are known as the [[The Fourteen Infallibles]].
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==Significance==
Muhammad's household is venerated by Muslims, who attach to them a special status.{{Citation needed|date=May 2010}} This is derived from verses in the Qur'an and hadith which stipulate love towards Muhammad's relatives, though in some cases interpretations differ, an example being: "Say: "No reward do I ask of you for this except the love of those near of kin."<ref>{{cite quran|42|23|s=ns}}</ref> According to classical [[tafsir|exegete]] [[al-Tabarani]] (260–360 AH) (873–970 CE) the verse most likely refers to Muslim believers related by blood ties. Another interpretation adopted by Shia applies the verse to the ahl al-bayt; while another view interprets the verse as commanding love for relatives in general. The latter view is favored by contemporary academic scholar Madelung.<ref>Madelung (1997) p. 13</ref>
 
Most Sunni [[Sufism|Sufi]] circles (''[[tariqa]]h'') trace their spiritual chain back to Muhammad through Ali.{{Citation needed|date=May 2010}} In Shia thought, Muhammad's household is central to the religion. In one version of Muhammad's [[The Farewell Sermon|farewell sermon]], he is represented as saying that God has given believers two safeguards: the Qur'an and his family; in other versions the two safeguards are the Qur'an and his [[Sunnah]] (statements and actions of Muhammad). Popular Shia belief ascribes cosmological importance to the family in various texts, wherein it is said that God would not have created ''[[Jannah]]'' ([[heaven]]) and earth, [[paradise]], [[Adam and Eve]], or anything else were it not for them. The majority of Shia regard the heads of the family as divinely chosen Imams who are [[Infallibility|infallible]] and [[Islamic views on sin|sinless]].<ref name=AB-EOI />
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==Әһл әл-Байт Құран Кәрімде==
==Ahl al-Bayt in the Qur'an==
There seems to be some confusion as regards where the Qur'an mentions the Ahlul Bayt. Laypeople{{Who|date=July 2010}} tend to confuse the word "Ahl" with "Ahl al-Bayt". Apart from Qur'anic quote 33:32-33:-
 
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